↑ Return to Community

Print this Page

Weather News Reel

Feeds Provided by www.ScienceDaily.com

WEATHER | NATURAL DISASTERS | EARTHQUAKES | TSUNAMIS

WEATHER & NATURAL DISASTERS


New research will boost grasp of North American carbon cycle

For centuries, people have transformed and splintered landscapes and ecosystems in North America. This radical altering of nature makes it tough for scientists to analyze the continent’s life-sustaining carbon cycle — the biological, geological and chemical routes the element carbon takes to shift among earth, water and atmosphere.  

Fire seasons have become longer

A new analysis of 35 years of meteorological data confirms fire seasons have become longer. Fire season, which varies in timing and duration based on location, is defined as the time of year when wildfires are most likely to ignite, spread, and affect resources.

Researchers find reasons behind increases in urban flooding

While rising sea levels are the main driver for increasing flood risk to American cities, storm surges caused by weather patterns that favor high precipitation exacerbates ‘compound flooding’ potential. With nearly 40 percent of the US population residing in coastal areas, compound flooding can have devastating impacts for low-lying, densely populated and heavily developed regions when strong storm surge and high rainfall amounts occur together.

Destructive high-energy electrons streaking into Earth’s atmosphere from space

Scientists have engaged in a unique study of potentially destructive high-energy electrons streaking into Earth’s atmosphere from space, for the first time employing two distinctly different and distant vantage points high above the Earth.

Summer heatwaves: Patterns blocking low pressure areas explored

Stable high-pressure systems can lead to summer heatwaves — such as the one Europe is currently experiencing. The phenomenon is caused by the blocking of low pressure areas. Meteorologists are now shedding new light on the formation of blocking patterns.

Changing climate lengthens forest fire season

Over a 35-year period, the length of forest fire seasons worldwide increased by 18.7 percent due to more rain-free days and hotter temperatures, according to research. The study examined weather data from 1979 through 2013 to determine how a changing climate impacts forest ecosystems.

NASA satellite camera provides ‘EPIC’ view of Earth

A NASA camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth from one million miles away.

EARTHQUAKES


Residential tourism model implemented in tourist destinations has increased earthquake risk

Researchers warn that “because of real estate speculation and the management of public budgets based on income from the real estate business, seismic risk has been forgotten.” Taking as reference the town of Torrevieja, where one of the biggest earthquakes in the province of Alicante took place in 1829 with more than 389 dead and 209 wounded, the author has published an article on seismic risk in tourist destinations since “the technological solutions proposed in its Local Action Plan against earthquakes does not seem enough.”

Researchers map out trajectory of April 2015 earthquake in Nepal

Researchers have accurately mapped out the movement of the devastating 7.8-magnitude Nepal earthquake that killed over 9,000 and injured over 23,000 people. Scientists have determined that the earthquake was a rupture consisting of three different stages. The study could help a rapidly growing region understand its future seismic risks.

Researchers quantify nature’s role in human well-being

The benefits people reap from nature — or the harm they can suffer from natural disasters — can seem as obvious as an earthquake. Yet putting numbers to changes in those ecosystem services and how human well-being is affected has fallen short, until now. A team of researchers is advancing new modeling technology to quantify human dependence on nature, human well-being, and relationships between the two.

Why we live on Earth and not Venus

Compared to its celestial neighbors Venus and Mars, Earth is a pretty habitable place. So how did we get so lucky? A new study sheds light on the improbable evolutionary path that enabled Earth to sustain life.

Satellites peer into rock 50 miles beneath Tibetan Plateau

Gravity data captured by satellite has allowed researchers to take a closer look at the geology deep beneath the Tibetan Plateau.

Volcanic rocks resembling Roman concrete explain record uplift in Italian caldera

Fiber-reinforced rocks discovered at the site of Italy’s dormant Campi Flegrei volcano are similar to a wonder-material used by the ancients to construct enduring structures such as the Pantheon, and may lead to improved construction materials.

Geology: Slow episodic slip probably occurs in the plate boundary

Scientists have discovered slow-moving low-frequency tremors which occur at the shallow subduction plate boundary in Hyuga-nada, off east Kyushu. This indicates the possibility that the plate boundary in the vicinity of the Nankai Trough is slipping episodically and slowly (over days or weeks) without inducing a strong seismic wave.

TSUNAMIS


Geology: Slow episodic slip probably occurs in the plate boundary

Scientists have discovered slow-moving low-frequency tremors which occur at the shallow subduction plate boundary in Hyuga-nada, off east Kyushu. This indicates the possibility that the plate boundary in the vicinity of the Nankai Trough is slipping episodically and slowly (over days or weeks) without inducing a strong seismic wave.

Indonesian mud volcano likely human-caused, study suggests

New research hopes to close the debate on whether a major mud volcano disaster in Indonesia was triggered by an earthquake or had human-made origins.

Understanding subduction zone earthquakes: The 2004 Sumatra earthquake

The 26 December 2004 Mw ~9.2 Indian Ocean earthquake (also known as the Sumatra-Andaman or Aceh-Andaman earthquake), which generated massive, destructive tsunamis, especially along the Aceh coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia, clearly demonstrated the need for a better understanding of how frequently subduction zone earthquakes and tsunamis occur.

Are rogue waves predictable?

A comparative analysis of rogue waves in different physical systems comes to the surprising conclusion that these rare events are not completely unpredictable.

Signs of ancient earthquakes may raise risks for New Zealand

Researchers have uncovered the first geologic evidence that New Zealand’s southern Hikurangi margin can rupture during large earthquakes. The two earthquakes took place within the last 1000 years, and one was accompanied by a tsunami, according to the study.

Earthquakes: Supercycles in subduction zones

When tectonic plates collide, they produce earthquakes like the recent one in Nepal. Researchers are providing new ways to explain how and why earthquake supercycles occur in zones where one plate moves under another, such as off the coast of Japan.

Tidal tugs on ‘Teflon’ faults drive slow-slipping earthquakes

Teasing out how slow, silent earthquakes respond to tidal forces lets researchers calculate the friction inside the fault, which could help understand when and how the more hazardous earthquakes occur.

METEOROLOGY CURRENT EVENTS


Permanent link to this article: http://afcw.com/community/weather-news-reel/