↑ Return to Community

Print this Page

Weather News Reel

Feeds Provided by www.ScienceDaily.com

WEATHER | NATURAL DISASTERS | EARTHQUAKES | TSUNAMIS

WEATHER & NATURAL DISASTERS


More big storms increase tropical rainfall totals

Increasing rainfall in certain parts of the tropics, colloquially described as the wet get wetter and warm get wetter, has long been a projection of climate change. Now observations have shown that an increase in large thunderstorms is the primary reason for this phenomenon.

Ocean circulation changing: Ten years of ocean monitoring uncovers secrets of changing UK winters

A groundbreaking project to observe and analyse regular data about ocean circulation and how it impacts Britain’s climate has reached a 10-year milestone, giving valuable new insights into how ocean currents can affect global warming.

Gulf Stream system: Atlantic Ocean overturning, responsible for mild climate in northwestern Europe, is slowing

The Atlantic overturning is one of Earth’s most important heat transport systems, pumping warm water northwards and cold water southwards. Also known as the Gulf Stream system, it is responsible for the mild climate in northwestern Europe. Scientists now found evidence for a slowdown of the overturning — multiple lines of observation suggest that in recent decades, the current system has been weaker than ever before in the last century, or even in the last millennium.

Forest managers hindered in efforts to use prescribed burns to control costly wildfires

Land managers use prescribed burns to help prevent wildfires and protect the ecosystem. They prefer to burn every few years, but costs, liability and proximity to development prevent them from performing the prescriptive burns.

Tropical cyclone size controlled by relative sea-surface temperatures

The size of tropical cyclones is controlled by their underlying sea-surface temperatures (SST) relative to the conditions of the mean SST within the surrounding tropical zone of the storms, researchers have found. These findings imply that under a warmer climate, the size of tropical cyclones (including hurricanes), are not based on the absolute value of SST alone.

Gulf of Mexico marine food web changes over the decades

Scientists in the Gulf of Mexico now have a better understanding of how naturally-occurring climate cycles — as well as human activities — can cause widespread ecosystem changes. These major shifts happen once every few decades in the Gulf, and can impact ecosystem components, including fisheries. Understanding how and why these shifts occur can help communities and industries alter management strategies in light of them.

Frequency of tornadoes, hail linked to El Niño, La Niña

Climate scientists can spot El Niño and La Niña conditions developing months ahead of time, and they use this knowledge to make more accurate forecasts of droughts, flooding and even hurricane activity around the world. Now, a new study shows that El Niño and La Niña conditions can also help predict the frequency of tornadoes and hail storms in some of the most susceptible regions of the United States.

EARTHQUAKES


Deadly Japan earthquake and tsunami spurred global warming, ozone loss

Buildings destroyed by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake released thousands of tons of climate-warming and ozone-depleting chemicals into the atmosphere, according to a new study.

Soils retain, contain radioactivity in Fukushima

The soil’s physical and chemical properties in rice fields around the Fukushima site have been the focus of recent study. Researchers examined factors affecting soil-to-plant transfer of radioactive cesium (radiocesium) in the Fukushima area.

A stiff new layer in Earth’s mantle

By crushing minerals between diamonds, a new study suggests the existence of an unknown layer inside Earth: part of the lower mantle where the rock gets three times stiffer. The discovery may explain a mystery: why slabs of Earth’s sinking tectonic plates sometimes stall and thicken 930 miles underground.

An ‘octopus’ robot with eight limbs developed to clear rubble in Fukushima, Japan

Researchers in Japan have jointly developed a robot with four arms and four crawlers which can perform multiple tasks simultaneously to help clean up the rubble left after the 2011 quake-tsunami disasters in Minamisoma, Fukushima.

Finding fault: New information may help understand earthquakes

New modeling and analyses of fault geometry in the Earth’s crust by geoscientist are advancing knowledge about fault development in regions where one geologic plate slides past or over another, such as along California’s San Andreas Fault and the Denali Fault in central Alaska.

New long-term earthquake forecast for California

A new California earthquake forecast by the U.S. Geological Survey and partners revises scientific estimates for the chances of having large earthquakes over the next several decades.

Friction means Antarctic glaciers more sensitive to climate change than we thought

A new study finds that incorporating Coulomb friction into computer models increases the sensitivity of Antarctic ice sheets to temperature perturbations driven by climate change.

TSUNAMIS


Deadly Japan earthquake and tsunami spurred global warming, ozone loss

Buildings destroyed by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake released thousands of tons of climate-warming and ozone-depleting chemicals into the atmosphere, according to a new study.

An ‘octopus’ robot with eight limbs developed to clear rubble in Fukushima, Japan

Researchers in Japan have jointly developed a robot with four arms and four crawlers which can perform multiple tasks simultaneously to help clean up the rubble left after the 2011 quake-tsunami disasters in Minamisoma, Fukushima.

Ancient Caribbean tsunami caused by volcano collapse smaller than thought

Tsunamis triggered by the partial collapse of the Caribbean Monserrat volcano, 13,000 years ago, would have been much smaller than previously thought, according to research. It was previously thought that a large submarine deposit of sediment at the base of the Monserrat volcano was the result of the abrupt, large scale collapse of the volcanic island into the sea. Therefore it had been thought that a high magnitude tsunami must have followed.

News coverage of Fukushima disaster minimized health risks to general population

A new analysis finds that U.S. news media coverage of the Fukushima disaster largely minimized health risks to the general population. Researchers analyzed more than 2,000 news articles from four major U.S. outlets.

New long-term earthquake forecast for California

A new California earthquake forecast by the U.S. Geological Survey and partners revises scientific estimates for the chances of having large earthquakes over the next several decades.

Tsunami on demand: Nanoscale rogue waves research sheds light on power to harness catastrophic events

A new study features a nano-optical chip that makes possible generating and controlling nanoscale rogue waves. The innovative chip was developed by an international team of physicists and is expected to have significant applications for energy research and environmental safety.

Yucatan Peninsula hit by tsunami 1,500 years ago, evidence indicates

The eastern coastline of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, a mecca for tourists, may have been walloped by a tsunami between 1,500 and 900 years ago, says a new study. There are several lines of evidence for an ancient tsunami, foremost a large, wedge-shaped berm about 15 feet above sea level paved with washing machine-sized stones, said the researchers. Set back in places more than a quarter of a mile from shore, the berm stretches for at least 30 miles, alternating between rocky headlands and crescent beaches as it tracks the outline of the Caribbean coast near the plush resorts of Playa del Carmen and Cancun.

METEOROLOGY CURRENT EVENTS


Permanent link to this article: http://afcw.com/community/weather-news-reel/