↑ Return to Community

Print this Page

Weather News Reel

Feeds Provided by www.ScienceDaily.com

WEATHER | NATURAL DISASTERS | EARTHQUAKES | TSUNAMIS

WEATHER & NATURAL DISASTERS


High mountains warming faster than expected

High elevation environments around the world may be warming much faster than previously thought, according to members of an international research team. They call for more aggressive monitoring of temperature changes in mountain regions and more attention to the potential consequences of warming.

Arctic beetles may be ideal marker of climate change

Researchers need to find ways to measure how the changes in climate are affecting biodiversity. One of the best places to look may be down at our feet, at beetles. That`s because, as a research team discovered after doing the first large-scale survey of Arctic beetles, these six-legged critters are not only abundant in number but also diverse in feeding habits and what they eat is closely linked to the latitude in which they are found.

Extending climate predictability beyond El Niño

Tropical Pacific climate variations and their global weather impacts may be predicted much further in advance than previously thought, according to research by an international team of climate scientists. The source of this predictability lies in the tight interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere and among the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian Oceans. Such long-term tropical climate forecasts are useful to the public and policy makers, researchers say.

Wind bursts strongly affect El Nino severity

A new study finds that prolonged wind bursts originating in the western Pacific can have a strong effect on whether an El Nino event will occur and how severe it is likely to be. The paper also identifies three distinct varieties of El Nino, and explains how these westerly wind bursts can determine which variety will take shape. The findings should help refine future predictions of these global-scale climate events.

Heat’s role in the Madden-Julian Oscillation

Tropical monsoons in Indonesia and floods in the United States are both provoked by the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), yet, despite its importance, global models often struggle to simulate it accurately. Scientists showed that MJO simulations are most sensitive to lower level heating in the atmosphere.

‘Warm blob’ in Pacific Ocean linked to weird weather across the US

An unusually warm patch of surface water, nicknamed ‘the blob’ when it emerged in early 2014, is part of a Pacific Ocean pattern that may be affecting everything from West Coast fisheries and water supplies to East Coast snowstorms. The blob is just one element of a broader pattern in the Pacific Ocean whose influence reaches much further — possibly to include two bone-chilling winters in the Eastern U.S.

Animals can adapt to increasingly frequent cold snaps

There is substantial genetic variation in nature for both long-term seasonal acclimation and short-term acclimation associated with rapid extreme weather events, a new study shows. While much of the emphasis regarding climate change is on overall warming, increased frequency of extreme weather events is also a critical concern. As fall and spring temperatures rise, animals will increasingly have to deal with rapid changes from warm conditions to dangerously cold temperatures as weather fronts sweep through.

EARTHQUAKES


Continental U. S: Map shows content and origins of the geologic basement

This map provides a picture of the nation’s geologic basement. More than 80 pieces of crust have been added to the nation’s basement since the Earth began preserving crust about 3.6 billion years ago.

Fracking? Injecting wastewater? New insight on ground shaking from human-made earthquakes

Significant strides in science have been made to better understand potential ground shaking from induced earthquakes, which are earthquakes triggered by human practices. Earthquake activity has sharply increased since 2009 in the central and eastern United States. Many questions have been raised about whether hydraulic fracturing — commonly referred to as “fracking” — is responsible for the recent increase of earthquakes. The increase has been linked to industrial operations that dispose of wastewater by injecting it into deep wells.

Scientists see deeper Yellowstone magma

Seismologists have discovered and made images of a reservoir of hot, partly molten rock 12 to 28 miles beneath the Yellowstone supervolcano, and it is 4.4 times larger than the shallower, long-known magma chamber. The hot rock in the newly discovered, deeper magma reservoir would fill the 1,000-cubic-mile Grand Canyon 11.2 times.

More Americans at risk from strong earthquakes, says new report

More than 143 million Americans living in the 48 contiguous states are exposed to potentially damaging ground shaking from earthquakes, with as many as 28 million people likely to experience strong shaking during their lifetime, according to new research.

Earthquake potential where there is no earthquake history

It may seem unlikely that a large earthquake would take place hundreds of kilometers away from a tectonic plate boundary, in areas with low levels of strain on the crust from tectonic motion. But major earthquakes such as New Zealand’s 2011 Mw 6.3 quake have shown that large earthquakes do occur. So what should seismologists look for if they want to identify where an earthquake might happen despite the absence of historical seismic activity?

Magma intrusion is likely source of Columbia-Ecuador border quake swarms

The ‘seismic crisis’ around the region of the Chiles and Cerro Negro de Mayasquer volcanoes near the Columbia-Ecuador border is likely caused by intruding magma, according to a new report.

Likely cause of 2013-14 earthquakes: Combination of gas field fluid injection and removal

A seismology team finds that high volumes of wastewater injection combined with saltwater (brine) extraction from natural gas wells is the most likely cause of earthquakes near Azle, Texas, from late 2013 through spring 2014. The team identified two intersecting faults and developed a sophisticated 3-D model to assess changing fluid pressure within a rock formation, and the stress changes induced by both wastewater injection and gas production wells.

TSUNAMIS


Earthquake potential where there is no earthquake history

It may seem unlikely that a large earthquake would take place hundreds of kilometers away from a tectonic plate boundary, in areas with low levels of strain on the crust from tectonic motion. But major earthquakes such as New Zealand’s 2011 Mw 6.3 quake have shown that large earthquakes do occur. So what should seismologists look for if they want to identify where an earthquake might happen despite the absence of historical seismic activity?

Magma intrusion is likely source of Columbia-Ecuador border quake swarms

The ‘seismic crisis’ around the region of the Chiles and Cerro Negro de Mayasquer volcanoes near the Columbia-Ecuador border is likely caused by intruding magma, according to a new report.

New research complicates seismic hazard for British Columbia, Alaska region

The Pacific and North America plate boundary off the coast of British Columbia and southeastern Alaska is a complex system of faults capable of producing very large earthquakes. The recent 2012 Mw 7.8 Haida Gwaii and 2013 Mw 7.5 Craig earthquakes released strain built up over years, but did not release strain along the Queen Charlotte Fault, which remains the likely source of a future large earthquake.

Deadly Japan earthquake and tsunami spurred global warming, ozone loss

Buildings destroyed by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake released thousands of tons of climate-warming and ozone-depleting chemicals into the atmosphere, according to a new study.

An ‘octopus’ robot with eight limbs developed to clear rubble in Fukushima, Japan

Researchers in Japan have jointly developed a robot with four arms and four crawlers which can perform multiple tasks simultaneously to help clean up the rubble left after the 2011 quake-tsunami disasters in Minamisoma, Fukushima.

Ancient Caribbean tsunami caused by volcano collapse smaller than thought

Tsunamis triggered by the partial collapse of the Caribbean Monserrat volcano, 13,000 years ago, would have been much smaller than previously thought, according to research. It was previously thought that a large submarine deposit of sediment at the base of the Monserrat volcano was the result of the abrupt, large scale collapse of the volcanic island into the sea. Therefore it had been thought that a high magnitude tsunami must have followed.

News coverage of Fukushima disaster minimized health risks to general population

A new analysis finds that U.S. news media coverage of the Fukushima disaster largely minimized health risks to the general population. Researchers analyzed more than 2,000 news articles from four major U.S. outlets.

METEOROLOGY CURRENT EVENTS


Permanent link to this article: http://afcw.com/community/weather-news-reel/